Juneteenth message from UAW President Rory L. Gamble

The observance of Juneteenth is recognition of a profound milestone in our nation’s history. And while our struggles for equality in the United States have been long and difficult and sometimes fraught with setbacks and terrible loss, today we reflect on how far we, as Americans, have come in this journey. There is still much

Juneteenth Letter from UAW and Ford

A culture of belonging and caring for each other starts with each one of us. In honor of Juneteenth, on Friday, June 18, we are inviting you to acknowledge and celebrate an important moment in U.S. history. Juneteenth is a date of major significance in American history and recognized as a moment of celebration in

Juneteenth: A brief history

Juneteenth is an annual celebration on June 19 marking the end of slavery in the United States. Though the Emancipation Proclamation took effect in 1863, freedom would not come for many enslaved African Americans until years later. On June 19th, 1865, Union soldiers brought news of the Civil War’s end to Galveston bringing with them

FREEP: Juneteenth feels different this year for autoworker

For Gerald Kariem, Juneteenth feels even more special in Detroit. So many successful Black Americans today are descendants of the millions of men and women who left the south for work in the north starting back in 1916 to build Ford cars. “That caused us to be able to have a place in society,” said Kariem, who started on the

UAW President Rory L. Gamble Juneteenth Memorial

Today, we take time to honor the memory of our lost brother, George Floyd. We will sit still, we will put down our tools and silence our phones for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. A full eight minutes and 46 seconds — the agonizing amount of time that Mr. Floyd lay on the pavement begging

UAW