Workers Memorial Day

Four UAW members perished in workplace incidents All workplace fatalities are avoidable. Through the collective bargaining process, we seek to make our workplaces safer and often negotiate stronger protections for our members than is required by federal, state and local laws and guidelines. We do this because all workers should leave their workplace in the

Being union helps women

Unions fought for many of the benefits workers now have such as the 40-hour work week, overtime pay, and improved health and safety standards, which have improved the lives of all workers. It is only through a strong union and worker voice that these benefits will remain intact. Worker’s wages have been stagnant and the

GM metal model maker honored as Michigan apprentice of the year

Rachel Harbin has always liked working with her hands and has a love for automobiles that runs in the family bloodline. She also has a love affair with learning, earning an associate’s degree, a bachelor’s degree and is close to earning her master’s degree. With a pedigree like that, it’s not hard to understand why

A heavenly voice

102-year-old UAW retiree’s a capella gospel career still soaring Thomas Kelly started singing before movies with sound became popular, before transatlantic commercial flight and before the UAW’s founding. He retired the same year the United States celebrated its 200th birthday following 30 years as a janitor at Chrysler’s former Eldon Axle plant in Detroit. Since

Strike! Using labor’s most powerful weapon effectively

The UAW grew out of a strike. Prior to 1936, our union organized one worksite at a time, but nothing on the scale of the gigantic assembly plants that had been growing into company towns since the age of automation. The Flint Sit-Down Strike of 1936-37 changed all of that. In one 44-day strike, the

Don’t be distracted by wedge issues

The 2016 election is, like all elections, an important one. Everything we’ve worked for in the last eight years is at stake and all the progress we’ve made could be reversed if we don’t elect the right candidates. From the presidential election to the city council seat, the decisions elected officials make every day affect

Water Crisis In Flint – March-April 2016

/* PRINT */ /* Numeration Styles */ /* Google Fonts */ /* END PRINT */ #flipbook-0 { width: 1544px; height: 1000px; } #flipbook-0 div.fb-page div.fb-page-content { margin: 0px 0px; } #flipbook-0 .turn-page { width: 772px; height: 1000px; background: transparent; border-top-right-radius: 0px; border-bottom-right-radius: 0px; } #flipbook-0 .turn-page-wrapper > div:nth-child(2) { border-radius: 0px; border-top-right-radius: 0px; border-bottom-right-radius: 0px;

Report to members on the union’s finances

As many of you are no doubt aware, the maintenance unit at Volkswagen in Chattanooga, Tennessee, overwhelmingly voted in a federally supervised election in December to have the UAW as its legally recognized collective bargaining representative. These efforts at providing representation to workers who ask for it are critical to our union’s goal of building

African-Americans have played a crucial role in the UAW’s rich history

February is Black History Month, a time to acknowledge and celebrate the accomplishments of African-Americans throughout our nation’s history. This year we celebrate some of the many African-Americans who contributed to the union’s enormous commitment to civil  and human rights, and we give our thanks for their sacrifice, vision and hard work. Here are highlights

A disappointing turn of events

Volkswagen refuses to negotiate with union members The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) describes collective bargaining as an effort between an employer and employees to “bargain in good faith about wages, hours, vacation time, insurance, safety practices and other subjects.” It’s really that simple: The democratically elected representatives of the workers sit down with company

UAW