BLOOMBERG: History Was Made in Selma—But Not For Selma

Fifty years after America was changed on the Edmund Pettus bridge, residents of the struggling city hope the anniversary will bring more: tourists, economic revival, the promise of Bloody Sunday finally fulfilled.

Most weekdays for the last 10 years, Letasha Irby, 36, has driven her car across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., to get to a job that pays $11.33 an hour. The black mother of two lives about a 20-minute drive from the iconic bridge, which is named in honor of a Reconstruction-era Alabama Ku Klux Klan leader and U.S. senator and is the spot where demonstrators were set upon by police in an event that’s come to be known as Bloody Sunday… Read full article >>>